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Carrie E. Bearden

UCLA

cbearden@mednet.ucla.edu

300 MP, Suite 2265

Los Angeles, California 90095
United States
310-206-2983

Carrie Bearden's Website
CV
NIH Biosketch
NSF Biosketch

Keywords:
neurogenetic disorders ; psychosis; schizophrenia; brain development; bipolar disorder; endophenotypes

Statement:
Carrie E. Bearden is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences and the Department of Psychology at UCLA, and a faculty member in the Brain Research Institute. She is also the assessment director for the Center for the Assessment and Prevention of Prodromal States (CAPPS), a clinical research center for early detection and prevention of major mental illness in at-risk youth based in the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. In this project, adolescents and young adults who are at risk for imminent onset of psychosis are followed longitudinally, to identify the neural changes that occur proximally to onset of psychosis. Dr. Bearden received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 1999, and conducted postdoctoral research in pediatric cognitive neuroscience at the Childrenís Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Beardenís research aims to understand genetic influences on brain structure in the development of psychosis and mood disorder, using converging methods to study cognition and neuroanatomy in clinical high-risk samples, and in possible 'genetic subtypes' of the disease with very high penetrance (i.e., 22q11.2 microdeletions). She is particularly interested in the dynamic processes that occur during adolescence, which may have special relevance to the development of these disorders. Most recently, she received an NIMH grant to examine neural endophenotypes of bipolar disorder in a genetically isolated population in Latin America. In this project, in collaboration with Center Director Nelson Freimer, Dr. Bearden hopes to identify and genetically map heritable, quantitative traits related to bipolar disorder in 11 pedigrees from closely related two population isolates: Antioquia, Colombia, and the Central Valley of Costa Rica.

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